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Glasfachschule - facts and figures (Fakten und Daten)
by nora and alex

history

The roots of the vocational college of glass go back to the tradition of Bohemian glass refiners.

Our school was founded in 1947 after the Second World War by glass professionals who came as refugees from a former German region in Eastern Europe, the Sudetenland.

Since Sudetenland was part of Northern Bohemia, the glass professionals came from the rich tradition of Bohemian glass refinement.

With the aim of keeping this tradition alive, the refugees founded this school - with help of the teachers of the other vocational colleges of glass "Steinschönau" and "Haida" in former Sudetenland.

On April 1st, 1948, the school for glass and ceramics first opened its doors in another, much smaller building, the former mayoralty.

In those early years, short after the war, improvisation of every kind was daily routine and teachers supplied the school with material to set up the workshops, to heat the building during the cold months, and to make teaching possible.

From the beginning onwards, the school was supported and sponsored by the German glass industry and trade organisations. Glass people learned to know the school at tradeshows and exhibitions and the reputation of the school grew accordingly.

European and worldwide Connections

The school works on projects together with related school from all over Europe. Students take part in exchange Programs with the Czech Republic and France. The World Wide Web nowadays opens up possibilities to connect schools, students and workshops to enable powerful and effective learning and studying.

Our school is one of ten German schools taking part in a scientific project in which the possibilities and benefits of e-learning are explored.

Glass is a small industry, compared with car manufacturing or the chemical industry. But glass and ceramics are materials without which everyday as well as high-tech products would not be possible.

In the department of glass technology and glass design at our vocational college we offer a triannual training in different glass professions.

There is the glazier with the professional subject area of glazing/vitrification and the glass refiner with the three professional subject areas of: (1) glass painting and glazing in arts and crafts, (2) grinding and engraving, (3) melioration of edges and surfaces.

The students use innovative melting techniques, state-of-the-art graphics programs as well as techniques of traditional craftsmanship.

Not only glass…

Apart from trainig in the glass and ceramic professions, the school offers two other professional triannnual trainings: in graphic/design and in media/communication. After three years, the students also have their A-levels and can go to a technical college of higher education for further studies.

For these careers a capacity for creative design, power of imagination, a talent for painting, a flair for detail, and endurance are required.

More figures…

School starts at 8.00 am and usually ends at 5.00 pm. There are about about 50 persons working in administration, as teachers and as workshop instructors. This term, there are approximately 600 students at our school, including part-time trainees.

glass workshops: glaziery

Nadine Ramton, Nadine Riese, Susanne Riether Tina Bengelsdorf, Lena Feldmann, Corinna Schneider, Nina Zarkh

Welcome/tour summary (Susanne Riether, Nadine Riese, Nadine Ramton)

Susanne: Good morning, ladies and gentleman. Welcome to the glaziery. We are proud to show you round our workshop. My name is Susanne, this is Nadine.

Nadine Ri.: And my name is also Nadine We are students in our first year of training. This is one of our teachers and instructors, Mr. Linden.

Nadine Ra.: Our tour has three parts: First, we will tell you something about our training in general. Then, we will look at an object and show you how it was made. Finally, we will be happy to answer your questions.

Training in the glaziery (Corinna Schneider, Nina Zarkh)

Hello, I am Corinna.

And I am Nina. We will tell you something about our training in the glaziery.

Here we learn how to make traditional and modern leaded glass objects. We also learn the basics about vitrification, carpentry and, picture framing.

Furthermore, we are trained to restore leaded glass objects and to do etching and sand blasting. For competitions like the Rheinbacher Glassprice we also do creative workpieces.

Our training lasts three years. In the first year, the trainees learn how to do simple glazing and cutting. In the second year we usually make our first own design, you can see some workpieces by the windows. During the third year we make combined workpieces. The task can include painting, screenprinting and another technique.

At the end of the training the students have to make their journeyman’s piece without help from their instructors and within a limited amount of time.

Showing a leaded glass object (Tina Bengelsdorf, Lena Feldmann)

Lena: Hello, I am Lena and this is Tina. We are students in our second year of training.

Tina: We will tell you something about this leaded glass window. It was crafted by Lena.

Lena: To craft this object I first had to scribble the intended design. After that, I needed the following material: float glass, lead cames, a lead knife, a glass cutter, nails, strips of wood, a soldering gun and fine solder.

Tina: According to the scribble Lena proceeded as follows: first she had to cut the float glass in ………………………….. This is our glass cutting table, where we cut the large pieces of glass. For glass cutting we use a diamond glass cutter and for breaking you need glass pliers.

Lena: Then I put the glass pieces in a tin plate with the lead cames – following a defined order. For working with lead you need different tools like lead knife and lead hammer. This construction is stabilized with the strips of wood and nails.

Tina: The next step was to solder the parts where the cames intersect – using the soldering gun and the fine solder. Then Lena had to cement the leaded glass with putty, using the putty knife.

Lena: At last I cleaned the window with sawdust and then with glasscleaner and a nail. The window was finished!

Questions and ending (whole glaziery team)

Do you have any questions?? Thank you for your attention! We hope you enjoyed our tour! Bye-bye.

glass workshops: painting workshop

BFS 1: Laura Jüngst, Raphaela Knein, Ann-Marie Vollmert, Robert Seibt

BFS 2: Nora Engler, Rebecca Hartmann, Miriam Klossak, Barbara Maier, Yvonne Schultz

Welcome/tour summary (Ann-Marie Vollmert, Robert Seibt)

Robert: Good morning, ladies and gentleman. Welcome to the glaziery. We are proud to show you around. My name is Robert.

Ann-Marie: And my name is Ann-Marie. We are students in our first year of training. This is one of our teachers and instructors, Mr. Linden. Our tour has three parts: First, we will tell you something about glass painting and our training in general.

Robert: Then, we will look at one object and show you how it was made. Finally, we will be happy to answer your questions.

Glass painting and training in the painting workshop part 1 (Laura Jüngst, Raphaela Knein)

Raphaela: Hello, I am Raphaela, and this is Laura. We are first-year students.

Laura: We will tell you something about glass painting.

Raphaela: Traditionally, glass painting referred to painting on the surface of a sheet of glass to be included in a stained glass work. This kind of painting was done to add details such as faces and folds of clothing that couldn't be added with traditional lead lines. It was also used to cover up portions of stained glass works so that light was kept from shining through.

Laura: In most cases, the glass paints used for stained glass painting are browns and gray-blacks. The colors tend to be water or turpentine based, and can be applied with a brush in a method similar to the way watercolors are applied. In most cases, these paints are fired onto the glass using a kiln. The heat of the kiln causes them to bond permanently with the glass.

Glass painting and training in the painting workshop part 2 (Nora Engler, Rebecca Hartmann, Miriam Klossak, Barbara Maier, Yvonne Schultz)

Powdered glass is dangerous if it gets into your lungs. Therefore we use a respirator mask when working with powdered glass. Here we learn how to do painted glass decoration and also how to restore painted glass objects. We also learn to scribble, to sketch and to draw. Furthermore, we are trained to restore stained glass objects and to do silk screen printing. For competitions like the Rheinbacher Glassprice we also do creative workpieces.

Our training lasts three years. In the first year, we learn how to do simple painting techniques. In the second year we usually create our first own design, traditional or modern. During the third year we make combined workpieces. The tasks can include various techniques.

At the end of the training we have to craft our journeyman’s piece without help from our instructors and within a limited amount of time.

object 1 (traditional design "coat of arms"), 2 (modern design "Atlantis") (Rebecca Hartmann, Barbara Maier, Yvonne Schultz)

painting workshop words in alphabetical order to apply auftragen to bond permanently with sth sich mit etwas dauerhaft verbinden brushes Pinsel to coat überziehen (techn.) coating, coating material Überzug colour powder Farbpulver colour sample Farbmuster coloured bunt, farbig contour Umriss, Kontur to cover up überdecken creative workpieces kreative Arbeiten to cut schneiden, zuschneiden details Details to etch ätzen diffusion colour, silver yellow Gelbbeize finely ground glass fein geriebenes Glas, Glaspulver to fire brennen to fire a colour onto a glass Farbe auf das Glas bennen glass jars Glasgefäße glass pane, sheet of glass Glasscheibe journeyman’s piece Gesellenstück kiln Brennofen leaded verbleit light box Lichtkasten light table Lichttisch to measure abmessen, ausmessen measure, -s Maß,-e to mix colour Farbe mischen outline (n) Aufriss, Entwurf, Gliederung, Kontur permanently dauerhaft quill Feder respirator mask Atemschutzmaske to restore restaurieren, wiederherstellen to scribble zeichnen, skizzieren to shade schattieren silk screen printing Siebdruck to solder löten solvent Lösungsmittel spatule Spatel to stipple Tupfen surface Oberfläche turpentine Terpentin water based auf Wasserbasis

object 1: coat of arms

Hello, I am ________________ and this is ______________. First, we will show you a traditional stained glass object, a coat of arms that” was crafted by a student in the second year of training. If you do a traditional design, you usually try to stick very close to the original and copy it as best as you can.

Traditional designs like this coat of arms are still very much in demand.

To craft this coat of arms we first have to scribble the intended design and to draw an outline, including the measures. After that, we need the following material: glass, lead cames, solder and soldering gun, glass powder, a solvent such as turpentine, screen printing oil, water or arabic gum, brushes, spatules and finally the kiln.

According to the scribble and the outline we proceed as follows: first we cut the glass pieces according to measure.

Then we...

The next step is to...

Now we have to...

At last we clean...

object 2: Atlantis

Now we will show you a modern stained glass object. This object is called “Atlantis” and was crafted by a student in the second year of training. If you do a modern design, you can use a broad range of techniques and be very creative. In fact, the steps remain quite similar whether you do a traditional or a modern design.

Questions and ending (whole painting team)

Do you have any questions?? Thank you for your attention! We hope you enjoyed our tour! Bye-bye.

Grinding workshop

Engraving workshop

Welcome/tour summary (Anne Niedenzu)

Good morning, ladies and gentleman. Welcome to the engraving workshop. We are proud to show you around. My name is Anne. I am a student in my first year of training. This is one of our teachers and instructors, Ms Schwarz/Ms Ritter. Our tour has three parts: First, we will tell you something about glass engraving in general. Then, we will look at one object and show you how it is made. Finally, we will be happy to answer your questions.

Glass engraving in general (Sarah Burger, Sabrina Caspar)

Sabrina: Hello, I am Sabrina.

Sarah: And I am Sarah. We will tell you something about glass engraving and about our workshop. Glass engraving involves using a tool to abrade the surface of the glass in order to leave a mark. There are many ways to do this, and many tools to do it. Here is a short introduction to some of the techniques which all come under the heading of 'glass engraving'.

Sabrina (shows an object: Point engraving involves marking the glass with a hand-held diamond or tungsten carbide point. The tool can be used to draw lines on the surface of the glass. You can also tap the surface of the glass lightly to create tiny white dots.

Sarah (shows an object): In stipple engraving the design is built up entirely of dots, defining areas of light and shade. Countless tint dots are engraved on glass with diamond points or tungsten steel pencils. The closer together the dots, the lighter the area will appear. This beautiful form of engraving is marked by its light transparent quality.

Sabrina (shows an object): In drill engraving you use an electric drill. With this tool you can create surface effects similar to those of hand engraving techniques but you can also cut into the glass more deeply to create the illusion of three dimensions.

Sarah (shows an object) Copper wheel engraving is a traditional technique which requires a belt-driven lathe carrying a range of spindles, each mounted with a wheel made from copper. A bit of carborundum grit, oil and paraffin is applied to the turning copper wheel and the glass is held against the wheel to make the cut. Coarse grit is used for rapid and large scale cutting, fine grit for more polished, delicate work. Most engravers now also use stone and diamond wheels. The copper wheel creates a very precise cut and was the tool originally used for traditional cut crystal designs.

Showing one or two objects

Sabrina (shows object 1 - copper-wheel engraving - or goes to student at workstation): Here in our engraving workshop we are trained especially in copper wheel engraving. Here we engrave ornaments, patterns and decorations on sheet glass like mirrors and window-panes. We also decorate hollow glass objects like vases and all kinds of drinking glasses. We use synthetic diamond, copper and corundum wheels for doing this

Sarah: To engrave a tumbler, for example, we first sketch the intended design on the glass with a felt-tip pen. Then we have to get our engraving workstation ready by turning on the machine and the water. We need the water to cool or anneal the glass during the engraving process.

Sabrina: When the wheel is rotating at the correct speed, we take the glass and press it against the wheel. Small wheels cut shapes like spheres, cotters, lines and ovals. After the engraving the glass can be polished with brushwheels.

Sarah (shows object 2 - sandblasting): We also use the sandblasting technique. Sandblasting is a quite new, industrial technique in which fine grit is projected onto the glass at high pressure. It is associated with mass produced designs, but in the hands of an artist it can produce highly individual and original results.

If you wish, we can show you the sandblasting machine.

Questions, bye-bye (Anne, Sabrina, Sarah)

Do you have any questions?? Thank you for your attention! We hope you enjoyed our tour! Bye-bye.

Talking about Glasfachschule - Glossary

GlassArt

GlassDesign

GlassGlossary

GlassHistory

GlassTechnology

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(C) die jeweiligen Autoren last change: 3. Juni 2007